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Original Article Food literacy and its relationship with food intake: a comparison between adults and older adults using 2021 Seoul Food Survey data
Seulgi Lee1orcid , Sohyun Park2,3orcid , Kirang Kim1orcid
Epidemiol Health 2023;45e2023062-0
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023062
Published online: July 3, 2023
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1Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea
2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
3The Korean Institute of Nutrition, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea
Corresponding author:  Kirang Kim,
Email: kirangkim@dankook.ac.kr
Received: 11 March 2023   • Accepted: 12 June 2023

OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to examine the differences in food literacy between adults and older adults and the association of food literacy with food group intake.
METHODS
In total, 4,039 participants from the 2021 Survey for Food Consumption in Seoul were included in this study. The intake of whole grains, high-protein foods, total vegetables, vegetables excluding kimchi and pickles, fresh fruits, and milk and dairy products was assessed using a simple food frequency questionnaire. Food literacy was measured using a food literacy measurement questionnaire.
RESULTS
With the exception of milk and dairy, adults had a significantly higher proportion of insufficient food intake than older adults (p<0.001). Both adults and older adults with sufficient food group consumption had higher food literacy scores. Notably, the difference in food literacy scores by level of food intake was highest for fresh fruits (p<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors affecting food literacy scores, a higher score was associated with a lower probability of having insufficient food intake in all food groups for both adults and older adults. Specifically, those in the highest food literacy score quartile were less likely to have insufficient intake of vegetables (odds ratio [OR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28 to 0.43) and fresh fruits (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.43), compared to the lowest quartile.
CONCLUSIONS
Improving food literacy is an important factor for promoting healthy food intake in older adults as well as adults. Therefore, it is necessary to develop intervention programs to work toward this goal.


Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health