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Estimation of the rate and number of underreported deliberate self-poisoning attempts in western Iran in 2015
Mehdi Moradinazar, Farid Najafi, Mohammad Reza Baneshi, Ali Akbar Haghdoost
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017023.   Published online June 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017023
  • 12,810 View
  • 172 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Rates of attempted deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) are subject to undercounting, underreporting, and denial of the suicide attempt. In this study, we estimated the rate of underreported DSP, which is the most common method of attempted suicide in Iran.
METHODS
We estimated the rate and number of unaccounted individuals who attempted DSP in western Iran in 2015 using a truncated count model. In this method, the number of people who attempted DSP but were not referred to any health care centers, n<sub>0</sub> , was calculated through integrating hospital and forensic data. The crude and age-adjusted rates of attempted DSP were estimated directly using the average population size of the city of Kermanshah and the World Health Organization (WHO) world standard population with and without accounting for underreporting. The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the confidence level.
RESULTS
The recorded number of people who attempted DSP was estimated by different methods to be in the range of 46.6 to 53.2% of the actual number of individuals who attempted DSP. The rate of underreported cases was higher among women than men and decreased as age increased. The rate of underreported cases decreased as the potency and intensity of toxic factors increased. The highest underreporting rates of 69.9, 51.2, and 21.5% were observed when oil and detergents (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code: X66), medications (ICD-10 code: X60-X64), and agricultural toxins (ICD-10 codes: X68, X69) were used for poisoning, respectively. Crude rates, with and without accounting for underreporting, were estimated by the mixture method as 167.5 per 100,000 persons and 331.7 per 100,000 persons, respectively, which decreased to 129.8 per 100,000 persons and 253.1 per 100,000 persons after adjusting for age on the basis of the WHO world standard population.
CONCLUSIONS
Nearly half of individuals who attempted DSP were not referred to a hospital for treatment or denied the suicide attempt for political or sociocultural reasons. Individuals with no access to counseling services are at a higher risk for repeated suicide attempts and fatal suicides.
Summary

Citations

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  • A validated dilute-and-shoot LC–MS-MS urine screening for the analysis of 95 illicit drugs and medicines: Insights from clinical and forensic Brazilian cases
    Bruno Pereira Dos Santos, Letícia Birk, Patrícia Schwarz, Viviane Cristina Sebben, Ângela Malysz Sgaravatti, Giovanna Cristiano de Gouveia, Adriana Ubirajara Silva Petry, Francisco Paz de Menezes, Alexsandro Pinto Gonzaga, Paula Flores Schlickmann, Marcel
    Journal of Analytical Toxicology.2024; 48(5): 314.     CrossRef
  • Emergency department nurses’ perceptions of caring for patients with intentional self-poisoning: a qualitative study
    Salar Sharifi, Sina Valiee
    Emergency Care Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Age Changes and Suicidal Activity in Iran Over the Past Decade: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Hamid Sharif Nia, Mohammad Heidari, Navaz Naghavi, Rebecca H. Lehto, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Azar Jafari-Koulaee, Yasaman Hatef Matbue, Ameneh Yaghoobzadeh, Amir Hossein Goudarzian, Saeed Pahlevan Sharif
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  • Discovering the Unclassified Suicide Cases Among Undetermined Drug Overdose Deaths Using Machine Learning Techniques
    Daphne Liu, Mia Yu, Jeffrey Duncan, Anna Fondario, Hadi Kharrazi, Paul S. Nestadt
    Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.2020; 50(2): 333.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric Assessment of Deliberate Self-Poisoning
    Mehdi Moradinazar, Mehdi Shaygani, Mary Ataei, Rosita Naseri
    Psychiatric Annals.2019; 49(8): 362.     CrossRef
Effect change of obesity on diabetes depending on measurement: self-reported body mass index from 2012 Community Health Survey vs. directly measured from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Kyuhyun Yoon, Kyungduk Min, Heeran Chun, Soong-Nang Jang, Sung-il Cho
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015001.   Published online January 6, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015001
  • 18,256 View
  • 172 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Obesity is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among young and middle-aged adults in South Korea. To elaborate on the association between obesity and DM, subjective data from self-reporting survey or objective data from health examination is generally used. This study was conducted to validate the change of association from using these different measurements.
METHODS
Community Health Survey data and Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, as subjective and objective data respectively, were used. Population, resident in Seoul and over 45 aged, were selected for the study and the association between obesity and DM were defined by using multivariate logistic regression model.
RESULTS
In subjective data, DM prevalence was 12.4% (male, 14.7; female, 10.6) and obesity prevalence was 26.0% (male, 29.2; female, 23.4). Whereas, in objective data, DM prevalence was 15.0% (male, 17.8; female, 12.9), and obese population was 32.4% (male, 34.4; female, 30.8). Based on the effect of obesity on DM prevalence from each data, using objective data increased the impact of obesity. Difference of relative risk of obesity between from subjective data and from objective was bigger in female than male and statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS
The differences of association pattern between subjective and objective data were found, due to higher obesity prevalence in objective data, and discrepancies of socio-economic status. These discrepancies could be inevitable Therefore we have to face them proactively, and understand the different aspect of various variables from different measurement.
Summary
Korean summary
지역사회건강조사는 각 지역의 건강관련 지표들을 제시하기 위한 기본 목적을 가지고 있으나, 자가보고를 통한 자료수집에 의존하고 있다는 면에서 연구결과의 신뢰성에 한계를 가지고 있다고 인식되어왔다. 본 연구는 실측자료와 자가보고자료에서의 분석결과차이를 파악함으로써, 이러한 인식에 대한 직접적 평가와 더불어, 자가보고자료에 대한 활용도 증진에 기여하고자 하였다. 연구 결과, 비만의 당뇨병에 대한 영향은 실측자료보다 자가보고자료에서 더 작아졌고, 이러한 차이는 남성에서보다 여성에서 더 크게 나타났다.

Citations

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  • Comparison of estimates and time series stability of Korea Community Health Survey and Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Ji Son Ki, Ho Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2019; 41: e2019012.     CrossRef
Brief Communication
Quality of Cohort Studies Reporting Post the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement
Jalal Poorolajal, Zahra Cheraghi, Amin Doosti Irani, Shahab Rezaeian
Epidemiol Health. 2011;33:e2011005.   Published online June 7, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2011005
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  • 172 Download
  • 47 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
<p>The quality of reporting of cohort studies published in the most prestigious scientific medical journals was investigated to indicate to what extent the items in the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist are addressed. Six top scientific medical journals with high impact factor were selected including New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, British Medical Journal, Archive of Internal Medicine, and Canadian Medical Association Journal. Ten cohort studies published in 2010 were selected randomly from each journal. The percentage of items in the STROBE checklist that were addressed in each study was investigated. The total percentage of items addressed by these studies was 69.3 (95% confidence interval: 59.6 to 79.0). We concluded that reporting of <italic>cohort</italic> studies published in the most prestigious scientific medical journals is not clear enough yet. The reporting of other types of observational studies such as case-control and cross-sectional studies particularly those being published in less prestigious journals expected to be much more imprecise.</p>
Summary

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Original Articles
Is the Tuberculosis Case Reporting Rate of Medical Care Institutions in Private Sector low?
Jong Seon Han, Won Gi Jhang, Young Hwangbo, Sung Soo Lee, Moran Ki
Korean J Epidemiol. 2008;30(2):230-238.   Published online December 31, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/kje.2008.30.2.230
  • 6,968 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
PURPOSE
To estimate the reporting rate of tuberculosis in one medium-sized city in Korea.
METHODS
Data claimed by national health insurance corporationand notification data of KTBS (Korea Tuberculosis Surveillance System) were compared through medical record-linkage method. Regarding the cases that were claimed medical care fee as tuberculosis but not notified to KTBS, we reviewed medical charts of the patients and investigated the reasons of failure to notify.
RESULTS
Number of cases claimed health insurance fee as tuberculosis occurrences in Cheonan was 2,331 in 2007, while 956 cases were matched as notified cases to KTBS after electronic record-linkage by personal identifier. Among remaining 1,375 cases that were not matched, real missed cases through medical record review survey were found to be 104. The reasons of failure to notify were because of 'not tuberculosis patients' (500, 36.4%), 'notified in 2006' (421, 30.6%), 'diseases coding error' (341, 24.8%) and 'notified as other diseases' (9, 0.7%). Therefore, the corrected reporting rate was calculated at 93% (95% CI: 91.6% - 94.2%). Notably, reporting rate of clinics (58.1%) was significantly lower than those of hospitals (93.4%) or general hospitals (96.6%).
CONCLUSIONS
All cases of tuberculosis diagnosis, which were claimed and not notified, were verified, the reporting rate was not as low as that of the data known through media. However, to reach the goal of tuberculosis elimination (reporting rate over 95%), more effort into improvement of the reporting system is necessary.
Summary
Reporting of National Notifiable Infectious Diseases (NNIDs) and Related Characteristics.
Ye soon Kim, Kee ho Park, Hyo soon Yoo, Jun wook Kwon, Euichul Shin
Korean J Epidemiol. 2007;29(2):200-210.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
communicable diseases. The purposes of the study is to estimate reporting proportion of National Notifiable Infectious Diseases(NNIDs) and investigate characteristics related to reporting using KAP(knowledge, attitude, practice) model.
METHOD
We surveyed randomly selected 2,185 physicians (speciality: internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, dermatology, general physicians) of their knowledge, attitude, and practice of NNIDs reporting through self-administered mail questionnaires. Of them, 231 physicians responded (response proportion: 10.6%).
RESULT
The reporting proportion was estimated to 27.0%. Recognition level (knowledge) of NNIDs was relatively high with proportion of 69.4%, and attitude (public health importance) of reporting was 65.8%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that knowledge, attitude significantly affected physicians' reporting in a positive direction (O.R. 6.2, 6.2 respectively). Whereas, senior age group, specialty (family medicine, pediatrics, dermatology) showed significantly lower reporting. General (tertiary care) hospital level of care showed significantly higher reporting practice (alpha=0.05).
CONCLUSION
The NNIDs reporting proportion, 27.0% is similar with those studied recently. Continuous efforts to increase the performance level of communicable diseases surveillance system. Of those, restructuring surveillance systems considering characteristics of notifiable diseases classes must be stressed. Educational approach of physicians needs to be tailored specially to newly-designated diseases such as Group II, Designated Group NNIDs.
Summary

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health