Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
3 "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
COVID-19: Systematic Review
Clinical outcomes of COVID-19 amongst HIV patients: a systematic literature review
Thomas Massarvva
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021036.   Published online May 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021036
  • 11,686 View
  • 411 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The global pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in the city of Wuhan, China around December 2019. Since then, the virus has caused severe morbidity and mortality worldwide and has put pressure on the global medical system. Still, there are limited data regarding the clinical impact of COVID-19 on people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The primary aim of this study was, therefore, to systematically review up-to-date studies reporting the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 amongst HIV patients.
METHODS
A thorough literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library Databases in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines.
RESULTS
A total of 22 studies were identified. Amongst 730 HIV/COVID-19-coinfected patients, 79.4% were males, the median age was 51.5 years, and the number of reported patients receiving antiretroviral drugs was 708 (97.2%). Most coinfected patients had mild to moderate symptoms, including cough (37.7%), fever (37.5%), and dyspnoea (24.7%). Among pre-existing comorbidities, hypertension (26.3%) was the most prevalent in HIV/COVID-19 coinfected patients, and 87% of coinfected patients recovered.
CONCLUSIONS
Based on the existing data in this systematic literature review, HIV patients with pre-existing comorbidities, obesity, and older age should be considered as a high-risk group for COVID-19. Furthermore, coinfected patients appear to have marginally comparable clinical outcomes with the general population. The study’s findings highlight the need for further investigation to elucidate the impact of COVID-19 infection on HIV patients.
Summary
Key Message
In this systematic literature review, various aspects of COVID-19 outcomes amongst HIV patients are identified and quantified, including the proportion of different symptoms, severity, pre-existing comorbidities, recovery, death, and the most commonly prescribed antiretroviral drugs in HIV patients with COVID-19 coinfection.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Double Trouble Co-Infections: Understanding the Correlation Between COVID-19 and HIV Viruses
    Sassi Ashraf Ali Abbasi, Tarika Noor, Maneeth Mylavarapu, Monika Sahotra, Hunmble A Bashir, Rakshita Ramesh Bhat, Urmi Jindal, Uzma Amin, Anushree V, Humza F Siddiqui
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Associations of depression and anxiety with cardiovascular risk among people living with HIV/AIDS in Korea
Kyong Sil Park, Seon Young Hwang, Bo Youl Choi, June Kim, Sang Il Kim, Woo-Joo Kim, Chun Kang
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021002.   Published online December 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021002
  • 12,792 View
  • 384 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
As HIV/AIDS is becoming a chronic disease, the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) among people living with HIV/AIDS is rising. Anxiety and depression, which are common among people living with HIV/AIDS, have been linked with CVD. This study investigated the risk of CVD in people living with HIV/AIDS and explored the effects of depression and anxiety on CVD risk.
METHODS
Data were collected for 457 people enrolled in the Korea Cohort HIV/AIDS study after 2010. Framingham risk scores were calculated to quantify the 10-year risk of developing CVD. Depression and anxiety variables were re-coded as a single combined variable. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), duration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity after entry into the cohort, and depression/anxiety.
RESULTS
Participants with both depression and anxiety were 2.28 times more likely than those with neither depression nor anxiety to have moderate/high-risk CVD risk. The 10-year risk of developing CVD was affected by LDL cholesterol, TG, age, and duration of HIV infection. LDL cholesterol and TG levels change according to the duration of HIV infection, and metabolic disorders affect the risk of CVD. Thus, a longer duration of HIV infection is associated with a higher risk of developing CVD.
CONCLUSIONS
Screenings for depression and anxiety need to be provided regularly to assess the severity of those symptoms. To help decrease their risk of developing CVD, people living with HIV/AIDS should be offered behavioral modification interventions aimed at developing healthy lifestyle habits.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구를 통해 우울과 불안이 심혈관질환 발생위험을 증가시키는 영향요인임을 확인하였다. 따라서, HIV 감염자의 우울과 불안에 대한 정기적인 검사 및 상담이 필요하며, 우울 또는 불안한 환자의 심혈관질환의 발병 위험을 줄이기위해 좋은 생활 습관을 위한 행동 수정 및 동기 부여 교육프로그램의 개발이 필요하다.
Key Message
healthcare providers need to provide motivational education for behavioral modifications to decrease patients’ risk of developing CVD, especially among those with depression or anxiety symptoms.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comorbidities among persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Florida: a network analysis
    Shyfuddin Ahmed, Angel B. Algarin, Hsu Thadar, Zhi Zhou, Tanjila Taskin, Krishna Vaddiparti, Karina Villalba, Yan Wang, Nicole Ennis, Jamie P. Morano, Charurut Somboonwit, Robert L Cook, Gladys E. Ibañez
    AIDS Care.2023; 35(7): 1055.     CrossRef
  • Elevated frequency and everyday functioning implications of vascular depression in persons with HIV disease
    Ilex Beltran-Najera, Andrea Mustafa, Desmond Warren, Zach Salling, Maria Misiura, Steven Paul Woods, Vonetta M. Dotson
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2023; 160: 78.     CrossRef
  • MENTE X CORAÇÃO: AS DOENÇAS PSIQUICAS E AS CONSENQUÊNCIAS CARDIOVASCULARES: UMA REVISÃO DA LITERATURA
    Beatriz da Silva Araújo, Morgana Gonçalves da Silva
    Revista interdisciplinar em saúde.2021; 8(Único): 292.     CrossRef
Predictors of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection: a case-control study
Leila Molaeipoor, Jalal Poorolajal, Minoo Mohraz, Nader Esmailnasab
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014024.   Published online October 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014024
  • 18,897 View
  • 184 Download
  • 25 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection is a major global challenge. It is not clear why some HIV-positive people are co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) while others are not. This study addressed that question.
METHODS
This case-control study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in June 2004, enrolling 2,388 HIV-positive people. Cases were selected from those who were co-infected with TB and controls from those without TB. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and several predictors. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.
RESULTS
In this study, 241 cases were compared with 2,147 controls. Sex, age, marital status, educational level, imprisonment, smoking, narcotic use, route of HIV transmission, previous TB infection, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), antiretroviral therapy (ART), and low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) were independently associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection (p<0.001). However, after adjusting for all other variables in the model, only the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and the following predictors remained statistically significant: imprisonment (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.11-6.90), previous TB infection (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.99-15.39), IPT (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.06-0.31), ART (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.61), and CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 (OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.36-4.02).
CONCLUSIONS
Several predictors are associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection, but only a few indicators were significantly associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection. It is estimated that a number of predictors of M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection remain unknown and require further investigation.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Joint Modeling of Longitudinal Outcome and Competing Risks: Application to HIV/AIDS Data
    Khadijeh Najafi Ghobadi, Hossein Mahjub, Jalal Poorolajal, Ebrahim Shakiba, Kaivan Khassi, Ghodratollah Roshanaei
    Journal of Research in Health Sciences.2023; 23(1): e00571.     CrossRef
  • Clinico-epidemiological Determinants of Tuberculosis Co-infection among Adults Attending an Antiretroviral Centre at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Madhya Pradesh
    Preeti Gupta, Akanksha Tomar, Manoj Bansal, Rajesh Kumar Gupta
    Journal of Medical Evidence.2023; 4(3): 220.     CrossRef
  • The Occurrence of Tuberculosis Infection among Newly HIV Diagnosed Patient in Indonesia
    Rengga Rusfa Gumilang, Dwi Wahyu Indriati, Diyantoro Diyantoro, Aliyah Siti Sundari
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(A): 893.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Isoniazid Prophylaxis Therapy on the Prevention of Tuberculosis Incidence and Associated Factors Among HIV Infected Individuals in Northwest Ethiopia: Retrospective Cohort Study
    Mulat Addis Beshaw, Shitaye Alemu Balcha, Ayenew Molla Lakew
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 617.     CrossRef
  • EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT OF THE FIRST DETECTED TUBERCULOSIS DEPENDING ON THE HIV STATUS IN THE TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTION OF THE FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE
    V. S. Borovitsky
    HIV Infection and Immunosuppressive Disorders.2020; 12(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Active Tuberculosis Occurrences after ART Initiation among Adult HIV-Positive Clients in West Showa Zone Public Hospitals, Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study
    Gerbaba Guta Nugus, Mergitu Eliyas Irena
    Advances in Public Health.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of tuberculosis infection among adults visiting anti-retroviral treatment center at east and west Gojjam, northwest, Ethiopia, 2017
    Habtamu Belew, Moges Wubie, Getaye Tizazu, Abebaw Bitew, Tesfa Birlew
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bayesian Spatial Survival Analysis of Duration to Cure among New Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) Patients in Iran, during 2011–2018
    Eisa Nazar, Hossein Baghishani, Hassan Doosti, Vahid Ghavami, Ehsan Aryan, Mahshid Nasehi, Saeid Sharafi, Habibollah Esmaily, Jamshid Yazdani Charati
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 18(1): 54.     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between Clinical Manifestation and Radiological Findings In Pulmonary Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection Patients In Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia
    Putu Satyakumara Upadhana, Haikal Hamas Putra Iqra, I Gusti Agung Ayu Chintya Cahyarini, I Ketut Agus Somia, Pande Putu Yuli Anandasari
    Current HIV Research.2020; 18(6): 426.     CrossRef
  • THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS, COMBINED WITH HIV INFECTION IN THE TB FACILITY OF THE FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE, DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF DRUG RESISTANCE OF THE PATHOGEN
    V. S. Borovitsky
    HIV Infection and Immunosuppressive Disorders.2019; 11(3): 64.     CrossRef
  • Multistate recursively imputed survival trees for time-to-event data analysis: an application to AIDS and mortality post-HIV infection data
    Leili Tapak, Michael R. Kosorok, Majid Sadeghifar, Omid Hamidi
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identifying risk factors for progression to AIDS and mortality post-HIV infection using illness-death multistate model
    Omid Hamidi, Leili Tapak, Jalal Poorolajal, Payam Amini
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2017; 5(4): 163.     CrossRef
  • Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Hamadan, Iran: A registry-based cross-sectional study
    Salman Khazaei, Jafar Hassanzadeh, Shahab Rezaeian, Ebrahim Ghaderi, Somayeh Khazaei, Abdollah Mohammadian Hafshejani, Hamid Salehiniya, Ali Zahiri
    Egyptian Journal of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis.2016; 65(4): 825.     CrossRef
  • Survival rate of AIDS disease and mortality in HIV-infected patients: a meta-analysis
    J. Poorolajal, E. Hooshmand, H. Mahjub, N. Esmailnasab, E. Jenabi
    Public Health.2016; 139: 3.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS Patients Referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center: A Registry-Based Study in Abadan, Southwest of Iran
    Salman Khazaei, Leila Molaeipoor, Shahab Rezaeian, Erfan Ayubi, Mehran Yari, Ali Asghar Valipour, Somayeh Khazaei
    Shiraz E-Medical Journal.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prisoners co‐infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review
    Chantal L Edge, Emma J King, Kate Dolan, Martin McKee
    Journal of the International AIDS Society.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors of human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis co-infection
    Venkataramana Kandi
    Epidemiology and Health.2015; 37: e2015007.     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health