Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
3 "Rheumatoid arthritis"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, thromboembolism, and mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving Janus kinase inhibitors: a real-world retrospective observational study using Korean health insurance data
Hong Ki Min, Hyeongsu Kim, Ho Jin Jeong, Se Hee Kim, Hae-Rim Kim, Sang-Heon Lee, KunSei Lee, Soon-Ae Shin, Jong Heon Park
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023045.   Published online April 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023045
  • 6,524 View
  • 313 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study investigated whether Janus kinase inhibitors (JAKis) raise the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS
We conducted a real-world retrospective observational study using data obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. Two data sets were analyzed: tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi)/JAKi-naive RA patients (set 1) and all RA patients who used TNFis or JAKis (set 2). The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, cardiovascular (CV)-related mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), VTE, arterial thromboembolism (ATE), cancer, and all-cause mortality were compared between the JAKi and TNFi groups.
RESULTS
Set 1 included 1,596 RA patients (JAKi group: 645; TNFi group: 951), and set 2 included 11,765 RA patients (JAKi group: 2,498; TNFi group: 9,267). No adverse events (AEs) showed significantly higher IRRs in the JAKi groups than in the TNFi groups of sets 1 and 2. The HRs for MACE in the JAKi groups of sets 1 and 2 were 0.59 (95% confidence [CI], 0.35 to 0.99) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.97), respectively. The JAKi group of set 2 showed a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.20), but the other AEs did not demonstrate increased risks in the JAKi groups.
CONCLUSIONS
In this study, JAKis did not increase the risk of AMI, stroke, CV-related mortality, MACE, VTE, ATE, or cancer in Korean RA patients relative to TNFis.
Summary
Korean summary
1. 한국인 류마티스관절염 환자를 대상으로 한 실제임상자료 결과, JAK 억제제가 종양괴사인자 억제제에 비해 심혈관질환, 혈전증, 암 등의 심각한 부작용을 증가시키지는 않았다. 2. 본 연구를 토대로 한국인 대상자에서 JAK 억제제가 심혈관질환 등의 심각한 부작용을 증가시키는지에 대한 재평가가 필요하다.
Key Message
1. The real word-data based results showed that risks of MACE, thromboembolism, and cancers were not increased in Korean RA patients with JAK inhibitor when compared to Korean RA patients with TNF inhibitors. 2. Therefore, the risk of serious adverse events of JAK inhibitors in Korean population should be reconsidered and reassessed before adding black box warning of JAK inhibitors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multicenter evaluation of tofacitinib retention and safety in rheumatoid arthritis – why cardiovascular risk factors do not equate to overt risk
    Anna Felis-Giemza, Mateusz Moskal, Krzysztof Proc, Zbigniew Guzera, Marcin Stajszczyk, Karolina Palej, Kornelia Chmurzyńska, Piotr Wiland, Krzysztof Batko, Bogdan Batko
    Rheumatology.2024; 61(6): 414.     CrossRef
  • Biologics Versus JAK Inhibitors. Part I: Cancer Risk. A Narrative Review
    Miguel Mansilla-Polo, Daniel Morgado-Carrasco
    Dermatology and Therapy.2024; 14(6): 1389.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Effectiveness of Baricitinib in Chinese Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis: 24-Week Results from a Post-Marketing Safety Study
    Chan-yuan Wu, Qian Wang, Jian Shi, Xiu-ying Zhang, Rong Du, Jie-ruo Gu, Qi-huan Liu, Jiao Yu, Jia-wei Xu, Yan-jie Zhang, Hao Zhu, Meng-tao Li, Xiao-feng Zeng
    Rheumatology and Therapy.2023; 10(6): 1609.     CrossRef
  • Comparative cardiovascular safety with janus kinase inhibitors and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs as used in clinical practice: an observational cohort study from Sweden in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
    Hannah Bower, Thomas Frisell, Daniela di Giuseppe, Benedicte Delcoigne, Johan Askling
    RMD Open.2023; 9(4): e003630.     CrossRef
  • Are JAKis more effective among elderly patients with RA, smokers and those with higher cardiovascular risk? A comparative effectiveness study of b/tsDMARDs in Sweden
    Hannah Bower, Thomas Frisell, Daniela di Giuseppe, Benedicte Delcoigne, Ulf Lindström, Carl Turesson, Katerina Chatzidionysiou, Elisabet Lindqvist, Ann Knight, Helena Forsblad-d'Elia, Johan Askling
    RMD Open.2023; 9(4): e003648.     CrossRef
Epidemiological evaluation quality of life in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis: a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, blind allocation controlled of a modular program group intervention
Hadi Yousefi, Arvind Chopra, Rez Farrokhseresht, Sanjeev Sarmukaddam, Fariba Asadi Noghabi, Nilima Bedekar, Abdolhosain Madani
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015048.   Published online November 5, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015048
  • 15,888 View
  • 195 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Epidemiology has taken on new roles in the management of health care services. In this study, we developed a non-pharmacological self-management modular program group intervention and evaluated its efficacy as an adjunct therapy in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients were randomized to either participate in a non-equivalent intervention group along with the standard of care or only receive standard-of-care treatment at a community rheumatology center. The outcomes measured were a pain visual analog scale (VAS), patient general health (GH) on a VAS, and the Short Form-36 Version 2 (SF-36v2) scale measuring quality of life. These parameters were evaluated in the first week to obtain baseline values, and at 20, 32, 48, and 60 weeks to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention group. RESULTS: The patients were randomized, with 100 patients in the intervention group and 106 in the control group. The intervention and control groups were similar with regard to the percentage of women (86% vs. 89.6%), tobacco usage (25% vs. 19.8%), mean age (42.6±13.2 years vs. 46.6±10.9 years), and disease duration (15.3±6.7 months vs. 14.5±6.6 months). The mean outcomes were significantly different between the two groups, and post-hoc pairwise analysis demonstrated significant deterioration in the control group in contrast to improvement in the intervention group at the second, third, fourth, and fifth evaluations. Improvements were often seen as early as the 12-week and 24-week follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiology contributes to the evaluation of how well specific therapies or other health interventions prevent or control health problems. The modular program group intervention implemented in this study appears to be a suitable and feasible method to facilitate much more comprehensive management of early RA in socioeconomically challenged communities.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effects of Patient Education on Psychological Status and Clinical Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Zugui Wu, Yue Zhu, Yi Wang, Rui Zhou, Xiangling Ye, Zehua Chen, Congcong Li, Junyi Li, Zixuan Ye, Zhenbang Wang, Wengang Liu, Xuemeng Xu
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Aproximación de discapacidad en artritis reumatoide. Resultados de un programa de atención integral
    Sandra Milena Barrera Castro, Ángela Maryoure Gigliola Suárez Moya, Luis Mauricio Mora, Carolina Cardona, Edwin Antonio Jáuregui Cuartas, Yezid Alberto Muñoz Urrego
    Revista Colombiana de Reumatología.2017; 24(3): 138.     CrossRef
  • Approach to disability in rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a comprehensive care program
    Sandra Milena Barrera Castro, Ángela Maryoure Gigliola Suárez Moya, Luis Mauricio Mora, Carolina Cardona, Edwin Antonio Jáuregui Cuartas, Yezid Alberto Muñoz Urrego
    Revista Colombiana de Reumatología (English Edition).2017; 24(3): 138.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic and Employment Status of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Korea
Jeong-Mi Kwon, Jinnie Rhee, Hyemin Ku, Eui-Kyung Lee
Epidemiol Health. 2012;34:e2012003.   Published online May 7, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2012003
  • 16,732 View
  • 121 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
<sec><title>OBJECTIVES</title><p>This study investigates the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by gender and socio-economic characteristics. It also explores the differences in the employment status between RA patients and the general population without RA in Korea.</p></sec><sec><title>METHODS</title><p>We analyzed data from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV) conducted from 2007 to 2009. Prevalence rates were estimated for female and male patients with RA in terms of age, residence, education, income level, and occupation type. The female respondents aged 45 to 64 were divided into the RA population and the non-RA population in order to compare the employment status between the two groups.</p></sec><sec><title>RESULTS</title><p>The annual physician-diagnosed RA prevalence rate was 1.45%. The prevalence rate was 2.27% for women and 0.62% for men. Individuals with RA had a significantly lower employment rate than individuals without RA (41.7 vs. 68.1%). The main reason for non-employment among RA patients was health-related problems (47.1%). There was statistically significant difference in employment type among the two groups. The experience rates for sick leave and sick-in-bed due to RA were 1.7 and 3.9%, respectively.</p></sec><sec><title>CONCLUSION</title><p>Middle- and old-aged women accounted for the majority of the Korean RA population, which had a significant lower employment rate compared to the population without RA for both sexes. RA resulted in considerable productivity loss in Korea.</p></sec>
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Functional coding haplotypes and machine-learning feature elimination identifies predictors of Methotrexate Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients
    Ashley J.W. Lim, Lee Jin Lim, Brandon N.S. Ooi, Ee Tzun Koh, Justina Wei Lynn Tan, Samuel S. Chong, Chiea Chuen Khor, Lisa Tucker-Kellogg, Khai Pang Leong, Caroline G. Lee
    eBioMedicine.2022; 75: 103800.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Korea
    Hyoungyoung Kim, Yoon-Kyoung Sung
    Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.2021; 28(2): 60.     CrossRef
  • Age at menarche, age at natural menopause, and risk of rheumatoid arthritis — a Mendelian randomization study
    Jingjing Zhu, Zheng Niu, Lars Alfredsson, Lars Klareskog, Leonid Padyukov, Xia Jiang
    Arthritis Research & Therapy.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quality Indicators for Evaluating the Health Care of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: a Korean Expert Consensus
    Mi Ryoung Seo, Gunwoo Kim, Ki Won Moon, Yoon-Kyoung Sung, Jong Jin Yoo, Chong-Hyeon Yoon, Eun Bong Lee, Jisoo Lee, Eun Ha Kang, Hyungjin Kim, Eun-Jung Park, Wan-Sik Uhm, Myeung Su Lee, Seung-Won Lee, Byoong Yong Choi, Seung-Jae Hong, Han Joo Baek
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of diabetes mellitus on treatment and outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis at 5-year follow-up: results from a multi-ethnic Asian cohort
    Chuanhui Xu, Mei Yun Yong, Ee Tzun Koh, Rinkoo Dalan, Khai Pang Leong, Andrea Ang, Angela Li-Huan Chan, Grace Yin Lai Chan, Madelynn Tsu-Li Chan, Faith Li-Ann Chia, Hiok Hee Chng, Choon Guan Chua, Hwee Siew Howe, Ee Tzun Koh, Li Wearn Koh, Kok Ooi Kong, W
    Rheumatology Advances in Practice.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis in adults: Using the Korean National Health Insurance Service‒National Sample Cohort
    Kyeong Hee Lee, Yoon Young Choi
    Journal of Periodontology.2020; 91(9): 1186.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Mendelian Randomization Analysis
    Young Ho Lee
    Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.2020; 27(4): 241.     CrossRef
  • Causal relationship between years of education and the occurrence of rheumatoid arthritis
    Sang-Cheol Bae, Young Ho Lee
    Postgraduate Medical Journal.2019; 95(1125): 378.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in relation to serum cadmium concentrations: cross-sectional study using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data
    Sang Hyun Joo, Joongyub Lee, David Hutchinson, Yeong Wook Song
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(1): e023233.     CrossRef
  • Severity of Airflow Obstruction and Work Loss in a Nationwide Population of Working Age
    Sun Hye Shin, Jihwan Park, Juhee Cho, Don D. Sin, Hyun Lee, Hye Yun Park
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Formal Education Level on Measurement of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity
    Hyeon Su Kim, Ui Hong Jung, Hyesun Lee, Seong-Kyu Kim, Hwajeong Lee, Jung-Yoon Choe, Sang Gyu Kwak, Theodore Pincus, Sung-Hoon Park
    Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.2015; 22(4): 231.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Formal Education Level on Measurement of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity
    Young Ho Lee
    Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.2015; 22(5): 271.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Automated Assays for Measuring Serum Hyaluronic Acid: For the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Mi-Soon Han, Yongjung Park, Hyon-Suk Kim
    Laboratory Medicine Online.2014; 4(2): 98.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status. The relationship with health and autoimmune diseases
    Omar-Javier Calixto, Juan-Manuel Anaya
    Autoimmunity Reviews.2014; 13(6): 641.     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health