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Systematic Review
Food frequency questionnaires developed and validated in Iran: a systematic review
Arezoo Rezazadeh, Nasrrin Omidvar, Katherine L. Tucker
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020015.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020015
  • 13,826 View
  • 291 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
To systematically review and identify food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) developed for the Iranian population and their validation and reproducibility in order to determine possible research gaps and needs.
METHODS
Studies were selected by searching for relevant keywords in the PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Google Scholar, SID, and Iranmedex databases, unpublished data, and theses in November 2016 (updated in September 2019). All English-language and Persian-language papers were included. Duplicates, articles with unrelated content, and articles only containing a protocol were excluded. The FFQs were categorized based on: (1) number of food items in to short (≤80 items) and long (>80 items) and; (2) the aim of the FFQ to explore total consumption pattern/nutrients (general) or to detect specific nutrient(s)/food group(s) (specialized).
RESULTS
Sixteen reasonably validated questionnaires were identified. However, only 13 presented a reproducibility assessment. Ten FFQs were categorized as general (7 long, 3 short) and 6 as specialized (3 long, 3 short). The correlation coefficients for nutrient intake between dietary records or recalls and FFQs were 0.07-0.82 for long (general: 0.07-0.82 and specialized: 0.26-0.67) and 0.20-0.67 for short (general: 0.24-0.54 and specialized: 0.20-0.42) FFQs. Long FFQs showed higher validity and reproducibility than short FFQs. Reproducibility of FFQs was acceptable (0.32-0.89). The strongest correlations were reported by studies with shorter intervals between FFQs.
CONCLUSIONS
FFQs designed for the Iranian population appear to be appropriate tools for dietary assessment. Despite their acceptable reproducibility, their validity for assessing specific nutrients and their applicability for populations other than those they were developed for may be questionable.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Correlation of Dietary Macro- and Micro-Mineral Intake with Seminal Plasma Quality/Quantity and Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Infertile Compared to the Normal Men: a Case-Control Study
    Hossein Chiti, Elham Hosseini, Vahid Ebrahimi, Seyedeh Neda Mousavi
    Biological Trace Element Research.2024; 202(5): 1991.     CrossRef
  • Association between dietary selenium and zinc intake and risk of dilated cardiomyopathy in children: a case-control study
    Maryam Aryafar, Mohammad Mahdavi, Hossein Shahzadi, Yeganeh Rajabpour Ranjbar, Mohammad Hassan Sohouli, Sina Afzal, Asal Neshatbini Tehrani, Danial Fotros, Ghazal Daftari
    BMC Pediatrics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Implications of Vitamin D Status for Children’s Bone Health: A Data Mining Analyses of Observational Studies
    Mariana Leonel Martins, Beatriz Fernandes Arrepia, Lucas Jural, José Vicente-Gomila, Daniele Masterson, Lucianne Cople Maia, Maria Augusta Visconti, Andréa Fonseca-Gonçalves
    Pesquisa Brasileira em Odontopediatria e Clínica Integrada.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between healthy beverage index and sarcopenic obesity among women with overweight and obesity: a cross-sectional study
    Niloufar Rasaei, Rasool Ghaffarian-Ensaf, Fatemeh Gholami, Farideh Shiraseb, Alireza Khadem, Seyedeh Fatemeh Fatemi, Khadijeh Mirzaei
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association of dietary phytochemical index and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
    Bijan Ahmadi, Amirhossein Ramezani Ahmadi, Mohamadreza Jafari, Nava Morshedzadeh
    Food Science & Nutrition.2023; 11(7): 4010.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of maternal performance about food security in dietary diversity for children aged 12-24 months and its relationship with anthropometric measurements
    Sedigheh Yeganeh, Niloofar Motamed, Saeid Najafpour Boushehri, Razieh Bagherzadeh, Maryam Ravanipour
    BMC Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between nutritional facts and temperament of selected Iranians’ frequent food items: a summative content analysis study
    Mohsen Zakerian, Fatemeh Roudi, Fatemeh Mahjoub, Tannaz Jamialahmadi, Amirhossein Sahebkar, Malihe Motavasselian
    Archives of Medical Science – Atherosclerotic Diseases.2023; 8(1): 100.     CrossRef
  • The association between Healthy Beverage Index and psychological disorders among overweight and obese women: a cross-sectional study
    Niloufar Rasaei, Rasool Ghaffarian-Ensaf, Farideh Shiraseb, Faezeh Abaj, Fatemeh Gholami, Cain C. T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei
    BMC Women's Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluating macro‐ and micronutrients and food groups intake with the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease: Is there any association?
    Farnaz Farsi, Negin Tahvilian, Azadeh Heydarian, Sara Karimi, Sara Ebrahimi, Nasser Ebrahimi‐Daryani, Sanam Tabataba‐Vakili, Javad Heshmati, Marjan Mokhtare
    Food Science & Nutrition.2022; 10(11): 3920.     CrossRef
  • The interaction between rs 3,807,992 genotypes with the dietary inflammatory index on Leptin, Leptin resistance, and Galectin 3 in obese and overweight women
    Farideh Shiraseb, Mena Farazi, Niloufar Rasaei, Cain C. T. Clark, Shahin Jamili, Khadijeh Mirzaei
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interaction between CETP polymorphism and dietary insulin index and load in relation to cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic adults
    Faezeh Abaj, Masoumeh Rafiee, Fariba Koohdani
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dietary Antioxidants and Risk of Parkinson's Disease in the Singapore Chinese Health Study
    Ariel Fangting Ying, Shazma Khan, Ying Wu, Aizhen Jin, Aidan S.Y. Wong, Eng‐King Tan, Jian‐Min Yuan, Woon‐Puay Koh, Louis C.S. Tan
    Movement Disorders.2020; 35(10): 1765.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Application of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) to patients with cataract
Ali Gholami, Mahmood Tavakoli Araghi, Fatemeh Shamsabadi, Mahdiye Bayat, Fatemeh Dabirkhani, Farhad Moradpour, Kamyar Mansori, Yousef Moradi, Abdolhalim Rajabi
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016005.   Published online February 4, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016005
  • 20,249 View
  • 350 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Cataract is a prevalent disease in the elderly, and negatively influences patients’ quality of life. This study was conducted to study the application of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) to patients with cataract.
METHODS
In this cross-sectional study, 300 patients with cataract were studied in Neyshabur, Iran from July to October 2014. The Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used to measure their quality of life. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, the paired t-test, the independent t-test, and a linear regression model were used to analyze the data in SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA).
RESULTS
The mean age of the participants was 68.11±11.98 years, and most were female (53%). The overall observed Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the WHOQOL-BREF was 0.889, ranging from 0.714 to 0.810 in its four domains. The total mean score of the respondents on the WHOQOL-BREF was 13.19. The highest and lowest mean scores were observed in the social relationship domain (14.11) and the physical health domain (12.29), respectively. A backward multiple linear regression model found that duration of disease and marital status were associated with total WHOQOL scores, while age, duration of disease, marital status, and income level were associated with domains one through four, respectively (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS
The reliability analysis conducted in this study indicated that the WHOQOL-BREF scale exhibited an acceptable degree of internal consistency in the measurement of the quality of life of patients with cataract. It was also found that the patients with cataract who were surveyed reported a relatively moderate quality of life.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychometric evaluation of the WHOQOL-BREF and its shorter versions for general Thai population: confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis
    Krittaphas Kangwanrattanakul, Christian U. Krägeloh
    Quality of Life Research.2024; 33(2): 335.     CrossRef
  • Quality of Life and its sociodemographic determinants: a population-based study from rural Punjab, India
    Sapana Kasaudhan, Kallur Nava Saraswathy, Vineet Chaudhary
    Discover Social Science and Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of quality of life in glaucoma patients in a tertiary care center in Eastern India
    Saswati Sen, Alpana Mishra, Matuli Das, Vanaja Iyer, Mehak Sethi
    Indian Journal of Ophthalmology.2023; 71(7): 2767.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Contraception Awareness and Mental Well-Being in Teenagers and Young Adult Women: A Three-Year Cross-Sectional Analysis
    Denisa Hinoveanu, Doru Mihai Anastasiu, Cosmin Citu, Zoran Laurentiu Popa, Izabella Erdelean, Catalin Dumitru, Marius Biris, Flavius Olaru, Oana Neda-Stepan, Roxana Manuela Fericean, Eugen Radu Boia, Eugenia Maria Domuta, Lavinia Stelea
    Healthcare.2023; 11(22): 2990.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Analysis of the Quality of Life in Families with Children or Adolescents Having Congenital versus Acquired Neuropathology
    Maria V. Morcov, Liliana Pădure, Cristian G. Morcov, Andrada Mirea, Marian Ghiță, Gelu Onose
    Children.2022; 9(5): 714.     CrossRef
  • QUALITY OF LIFE ASSESSMENT IN BRONCHIECTASIS PATIENT
    Ankit Kumar, Sulakshana Gautam, Santosh Kumar, Vijeta Niranjan
    INDIAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH.2022; : 74.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life of older adults in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Accra, Ghana
    Dominic A. Alaazi, Devidas Menon, Tania Stafinski, Stephen Hodgins, Gian Jhangri
    Social Science & Medicine.2021; 270: 113659.     CrossRef
  • Cultural adaptation and validation of the Sidamic version of the World Health Organization Quality-of-Life-Bref Scale measuring the quality of life of women with severe preeclampsia in southern Ethiopia, 2020
    Birhanu Jikamo, Mulat Adefris, Telake Azale, Kassahun Alemu
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mental health literacy and quality of life in Iran: a cross-sectional study
    Alireza Jafari, Mahbobeh Nejatian, Vahideh Momeniyan, Fatemeh Ramezani Barsalani, Hadi Tehrani
    BMC Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quality of life among Syrian refugees in Germany: a cross-sectional pilot study
    Feras Al Masri, Mattea Müller, Josefine Nebl, Theresa Greupner, Andreas Hahn, Dorothee Straka
    Archives of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of health-related quality of life among tuberculosis patients in a public primary care facility in Indonesia
    Ika Sartika, WidyaNorma Insani, Rizky Abdulah
    Journal of Global Infectious Diseases.2019; 11(3): 102.     CrossRef
  • Validation and reliability of the Abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument (WHOQOL-BREF) in the hospitalized trauma population
    N. Kruithof, J.A. Haagsma, M. Karabatzakis, M.C. Cnossen, L. de Munter, C.L.P. van de Ree, M.A.C. de Jongh, S. Polinder
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  • Application of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) to patients with endometriosis
    Abolfazl Mehdizadeh Kashi, Yousef Moradi, Shahla Chaichian, Zahra Najmi, Kamyar Mansori, Forugh Salehin, Azade Rastgar, Sorour Khateri
    Obstetrics & Gynecology Science.2018; 61(5): 598.     CrossRef
Reproducibility of information on cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health status collected in the National Health Insurance Corporation health examination among 94,183 Korean military personnel.
Ki Ho Park
Korean J Epidemiol. 2005;27(2):51-60.
  • 65,535 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
While health examination data from the National Health Insurance Corporation (NHIC) have been used by many researchers for investigating the risk factors of cardiovascular disease or cancer, most studies have used measurements made on a single occasion at the start of the study (baseline measurements only) or 2 initial measurements in the beginning of the study period for their analyses. This study was conducted to investigate the reproducibility of information on cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health status collected in the NHIC health examinations by performing measurement and re-measurement data analysis techniques. A total of 94,183 military personnel, including commissioned and noncommissioned officers and public service workers, who had participated in both the 1998 and 2001 NHIC health examinations were included in this study. Reproducibility was excellent regarding height, weight, and body mass index. However, reproducibility was unsatisfactory for cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health status. In particular, low reproducibility was exhibited for blood pressure and physical exercise in both men and women. This study emphasizes the importance of considering regression dilution biases when conducting studies for disease risk factors using large population cohort data.
Summary

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health