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Associations of depressive symptoms with lower extremity function and balance in Korean older adults
Bong Jo Kim, Kyupin Ha, Hyun Soo Kim, Hye Ran Bae, Minkook Son
Epidemiol Health. 2024;46:e2024021.   Published online January 15, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2024021
  • 1,789 View
  • 59 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The relationship of depressive symptoms to lower extremity function and balance, especially in older adults without a depression diagnosis, remains unclear. Therefore, our study analyzed this relationship using a large sample of Korean older adults.
METHODS
We used data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service’s Health Screening Program database. Individuals aged 66 years who had undergone the National Screening Program for Transitional Ages in Korea and were without a diagnosis of depressive disorder were included. The lower extremity function and balance were evaluated using 2 physical tests, while depressive symptoms were assessed using a 3-question survey. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between depressive symptoms and lower extremity function and balance.
RESULTS
Among 66,041 individuals, those with depressive symptoms showed significantly higher rates of abnormal lower extremity function and abnormal balance. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of depressive symptoms to abnormal lower extremity function and abnormal balance were (aOR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.25 to 1.44) and (aOR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.48), respectively. Assessment of the relationship based on depressive symptom scores revealed that higher scores were associated with higher aORs (p for trend <0.001). Subgroup analyses further confirmed this relationship, especially among patients with cerebrovascular disease or dementia.
CONCLUSIONS
This study revealed an association between depressive symptoms and the abnormal lower extremity function and balance of 66-year-old individuals without a diagnosis of depressive disorder.
Summary
Association of plain water intake with self-reported depression and suicidality among Korean adolescents
Jung Woo Lee, Yookyung Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2024;46:e2024019.   Published online January 9, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2024019
  • 1,581 View
  • 53 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Adolescent depression and suicidality are serious health problems worldwide. Lower plain water intake has been proposed as a risk factor for depression in adults. This study investigated the association of daily plain water intake with self-reported depression and suicidality among Korean adolescents.
METHODS
We used nationwide data from 112,250 students aged 12-18 years who participated in the Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Surveys in 2019 and 2020. Daily plain water intake was categorized as <1 glass, 1-2 glasses, and ≥3 glasses. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported depression and suicidality were calculated using multiple regression analyses.
RESULTS
The weighted prevalence rates of self-reported depression, suicidal ideation, suicide planning, and suicide attempts were 26.7%, 12.0%, 3.8%, and 2.5%, respectively. Of the participants, 3.9%, 18.5%, and 77.7% were categorized into the <1 glass/day, 1-2 glass/day, and ≥3 glass/day groups, respectively. Compared to the reference group (≥3 glass/day), the lowest level of water intake (<1 glass/day) was associated with higher odds of self-reported depression (aOR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.39), suicidal ideation (aOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.55), suicide planning (aOR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.25 to 1.69), and suicide attempts (aOR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.67). Moderately lower water intake (1-2 glass/day) showed slightly increased odds of self-reported depression (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.10) and suicidal ideation (aOR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.14).
CONCLUSIONS
Lower plain water intake was significantly associated with a higher risk of self-reported depression and suicidality among Korean adolescents. Since this cross-sectional study is unable to establish a causal relationship, it underscores the need for additional longitudinal research.
Summary
Korean summary
- 한국 청소년들에서 하루 물 섭취량이 적을수록 스스로 느끼는 우울감과 자살성향 위험이 증가하였다. - 이 연구는 하루 물 섭취량 측정이 청소년 우울증과 자살성향을 선별할 수 있음을 시사한다.
Key Message
- Lower daily plain water intake is significantly associated with a higher risk of self-reported depression and suicidality in Korean adolescents. - It suggests that daily plain water consumption could potentially serve as a screening indicator to identify depression and suicidality in adolescents.
Performance pressure and mental health among finance workers in Korea: a cross-sectional study
Yu Min Lee, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023099.   Published online November 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023099
  • 1,851 View
  • 91 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
While issues related to mental health, including suicide, have been frequently reported among finance workers, no formal investigation has been undertaken. This study was conducted to analyze correlations between indicators of performance pressure, which is a characteristic of the finance sector, and mental health.
METHODS
An online survey was administered to 1,181 participants. Brief questionnaires were employed to ask general questions about participant characteristics, work environment, and the presence of performance pressure, suicidal thoughts/plans/attempts, depression (indicated by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and anxiety (measured with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7). Frequency analysis, chi-square testing, and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.
RESULTS
Of the 1,181 respondents, 797 (83.5%) reported feeling pressure to perform at work, while 252 (26.4%) admitted to occasional willingness to achieve results even through illegal activities. Multivariate logarithmic regression analysis was employed to examine the correlation between performance pressure and mental health. This analysis revealed that those expressing willingness to achieve results through illegal activities exhibited higher levels of suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.63; 99% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 2.55), plans (aOR, 1.75; 99% CI, 1.01 to 3.01), and attempts (aOR, 2.72; 99% CI, 1.06 to 6.98). Additionally, these individuals demonstrated higher levels of depression (aOR, 2.02; 99% CI, 1.34 to 3.06) and anxiety (aOR, 2.84; 99% CI, 1.81 to 4.46).
CONCLUSIONS
Performance pressure is prevalent within the finance industry. This pressure serves as a major source of stress for employees and is evident in 3 representative indicators of mental health: suicide, depression, and anxiety.
Summary
Korean summary
현대사회에서 많은 조직이 성과에 따른 보상과 처벌규정을 사용하여 인적자원을 관리함으로써 조직의 성장을 꾀한다. 특히 금융업의 경우 성과평가가 평가를 위한 가시적이고 단순한 지표들과 연계되면서, 근로자들은 부여된 실적만을 달성하기 위한 과도한 노력을 기울이게 된다. 이 연구를 통해 그 과정에서 개인들은 과도한 성과압박을 느끼고, 성과압박을 많이 느낄수록 다양한 업무상 정신질환(불안, 우울, 자살생각 및 시도 등)을 경험한다는 것을 보여주었다.
Key Message
Inappropriately selected performance indicators cause performance pressure, which is related to the occurrence of work-related mental disorders. This paper is meaningful in showing the current status of performance pressure in the Korean financial industry and showing the relationship between performance pressure and work-related mental health.
Application of a joint latent space item response model to clustering stressful life events and the Beck Depression Inventory-II: results from Korean epidemiological survey data
Hyun Joo Kim, Ye Jin Jeon, Hyeon Chang Kim, Ick Hoon Jin, Sun Jae Jung
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022093.   Published online October 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022093
  • 3,200 View
  • 78 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
According to previous findings, stressful life events (SLEs) and their subtypes are associated with depressive symptoms. However, few studies have explored potential models for these events and incidental symptoms of depression.
METHODS
Participants (3,966 men; 5,709 women) were recruited from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center cohort. SLEs were measured using a 47-item Life Experiences Survey (LES) with a standardized protocol. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Joint latent space item response models were applied by gender and age group (<50 vs. ≥50 years old).
RESULTS
Among the LES items, death or illness of close relatives, legal problems, sexual difficulties, family relationships, and social relationships shared latent positions with major depressive symptoms regardless of gender or age. We also observed a gender-specific domain: occupational and family-related items.
CONCLUSIONS
By projecting LES and BDI-II data onto the same interaction map for each subgroup, we could specify the associations between specific LES items and depressive symptoms.
Summary
Korean summary
- 본 연구는 성별, 연령에 따른 생활스트레스 항목과 Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) 로 측정한 우울증상 사이의 연관성을 Joint Latent space item response model (LSIRM) 방법을 사용하여 탐색하고자 하였다. - 한국 성인 인구집단 (3,966 남성; 5,709 여성)을 대상으로 연구를 수행한 결과, 생활스트레스 항목 중 가족 혹은 가까운 주변인의 죽음 혹은 질환, 법적인 문제, 성적 어려움, 가족 혹은 사회적 관계는 성별, 연령에 무관하게 우울 증상과 연관성이 있었으며, 직업, 일부 가족 관련 항목에서 성별 특이적인 연관성을 관찰하였다.
Key Message
- In this study, we used a joint latent space item response model (LSIRM) to project stressful life events and depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) onto an interaction map, which represents the interaction of BDI-II items and underlying traits with each SLE, while accounting for heterogeneity by sex and age group. - Among the LES items, death/illness of close relatives, legal problems, sexual difficulties, family relationships, and social relationships shared latent positions with major depressive symptoms regardless of sex or age group. But, in occupational and family-related items, sex-specific associations were observed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine nursing intervention in postoperative patients after gastrectomy
    Lizhi Fan, Ying He, Yufeng Li, Xinxin Li, Dan Liu, Rui Wang
    Oncology Letters.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Gender differences in the association between multimorbidity and depression in older Korean adults: an analysis of data from the National Survey of Older Koreans (2011-2017)
SeoYeon Hwang, Jin Young Nam, Jeong Hyun Ahn, Soojin Park
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022049.   Published online May 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022049
  • 9,102 View
  • 387 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Previous studies have shown that people with multimorbidity have a higher risk of depression than those without multimorbidity. However, few studies have examined the association between depression and multimorbidity in men and women separately. Since the rates of depression and multimorbidity are different in men and women, it is necessary to examine whether gender differences affect their association.
METHODS
This study included 30,138 participants (aged ≥ 65 years) from the National Survey of Older Koreans (2011-2017). Depression was defined using the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (SGDS-K). Multimorbidity was defined as people who had 2 or more chronic diseases, including arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, pulmonary disease, cancer, stroke, or osteoporosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between depression and multimorbidity.
RESULTS
In total, 22.2% and 30.7% of men and women, respectively, had depression. Those with multimorbidity had a higher risk of depression than those without chronic conditions; specifically, the difference in risk among men was greater than that among women. Age was considered a moderator for women. While the effects of pulmonary disease, stroke, and cancer were especially substantial in the integrated analysis, gender differences were observed related to various chronic conditions comorbid with heart disease.
CONCLUSIONS
There are gender differences in the association between multimorbidity and depression among older Korean adults. Therefore, gender-specific care should be provided to reduce depression in older adults with multimorbidity.
Summary
Korean summary
복합만성질환을 가진 남성 노인이 복합만성질환을 가진 여성 노인보다 우울증을 경험할 위험이 높았다. 특히 심장질환을 가진 남성 노인과 여성 노인은 심장질환을 포함한 만성질환의 개수에 따라 우울증 위험에 차이가 있었다. 노인들의 수명 향상을 위해 성별 차이를 고려한 치료 방안과 정책이 마련되어야 한다.
Key Message
Multimorbidity was associated with a high-risk of depression in older Korean adults and the effects of multimorbidity differed by gender.

Citations

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  • Exploring Factors Associated With Resilience and Physical Activity in Older Men and Women Post-Hip Fracture
    Hohyun Seong, Barbara Resnick, Sarah Holmes, Elizabeth Galik, Rachel Blankstein Breman, Richard H. Fortinsky, Shijun Zhu
    Journal of Applied Gerontology.2024; 43(6): 627.     CrossRef
  • Inter- and intrapopulation differences in the association between physical multimorbidity and depressive symptoms
    Haiyang Yu, Yike Zhang, Mengxiao Hu, Bowen Xiang, Sijia Wang, Qing Wang
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 354: 434.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Special Article
Mental health of Korean adults before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a special report of the 2020 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Hyunsuk Jeong, Suyeon Park, Jihee Kim, Kyungwon Oh, Hyeon Woo Yim
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022042.   Published online April 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022042
  • 14,663 View
  • 530 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the associated social distancing, limited freedom, and fear of an uncertain future are expected to have substantial mental health effects. We investigated mental health responses in the community during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea.
METHODS
We used 2016-2019 and 2020 data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) to assess pre-pandemic and pandemic mental health status, respectively, in terms of perceived severe stress, depression, and suicidal plans. All analyses were gender-stratified. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed according to age, employment status, and household income.
RESULTS
The percentage of Korean adults with suicidal plans increased significantly from 1.3%p (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.5) in 2016-2019 to 1.8%p (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.1) in 2020. Individuals in their 20s and 40s showed a marked increase in suicidal plans (1.2%p; 95% CI, 0.0 to 2.3 and 0.9%p; 95% CI, 0.0 to 1.8, respectively). In men, depression and perceived severe stress increased significantly from pre-COVID-19 to 2020. There was a 2.4%p (95% CI, 0.8 to 4.0) increase in depression among standard workers and a 2.9%p increase in depression in individuals in the second-highest quintile of household income from 2016 and 2018 to 2020.
CONCLUSIONS
As COVID-19 continued, mental health issues such as suicidal plans, depression, and severe stress increased significantly in young men and people in the second-highest quintile of household income. Proactive community mental health efforts are needed to prevent increases in the suicide rate resulting from prolonged exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Summary
Korean summary
코로나19 이전에 비해 코로나19 유행 첫 해 동안에 전체 인구에서 자살 계획 유병율이 유의하게 증가하였고 특히 20대-40대에서 증가 비율이 높았다. PHQ-9으로 측정한 우울증 유병율은 전체 남성에서 증가하였고 특히 30대 남성에서 증가 비율이 높았다. 코로나19 영향으로 자살 계획과 우울증과 같은 정신 건강 문제가 젊은 성인에서 크게 증가하였기 때문에 이러한 정신건강 문제가 자살률 증가로 이어지는 것을 방지하기 위해 국가적 차원의 체계적인 정책과 적극적인 지역사회 정신건강 중재가 필요하다.
Key Message
There was a significant increase in the prevalence of suicidal plan in the overall population during the first year of COVID-19 pandemic compared to pre-COVID-19. In particular, suicide plans increased among those in their 20s and 40s. The prevalence of PHQ-9 detected depression increased in all men, especially among men in their 30s. As mental health problems such as suicide planning and depression have significantly increased among young adults due to the impact of COVID-19, systematic policies at the national level and active community mental health interventions are needed to prevent these mental health problems from leading to an increase in suicide rates.

Citations

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  • Associations between discrimination experiences and symptoms of depression and anxiety among transgender adults: a nationwide cohort study of 269 transgender adults in South Korea
    Sungsub Choo, Ranyeong Kim, Hyemin Lee, Yun-Jung Eom, Horim Yi, Rockli Kim, Seung-Sup Kim
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.2024; 59(5): 859.     CrossRef
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    Joungsue Kim, Jiyoung Yoon, Inah Kim, Jeehee Min
    Healthcare.2024; 12(6): 645.     CrossRef
  • The Association of Acute Signs and Symptoms of COVID-19 and Exacerbation of Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Clinically Mild COVID-19: Retrospective Observational Study
    Sumi Sung, Su Hwan Kim, Changwoo Lee, Youlim Kim, Ye Seul Bae, Eui Kyu Chie
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2023; 9: e43003.     CrossRef
  • The Risk of Major Depressive Disorder Due to Cataracts among the Korean Elderly Population: Results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2016 and 2018
    Min-Jin Kang, Kyung-Yi Do, Nayeon Park, Min-Woo Kang, Kyoung Sook Jeong
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(2): 1547.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Mental Disorders and Associated Factors in Korean Adults: National Mental Health Survey of Korea 2021
    Soo Jung Rim, Bong-Jin Hahm, Su Jeong Seong, Jee Eun Park, Sung Man Chang, Byung-Soo Kim, Hyonggin An, Hong Jin Jeon, Jin Pyo Hong, Subin Park
    Psychiatry Investigation.2023; 20(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • The association mental health of adolescents with economic impact during the COVID-19 pandemic: a 2020 Korean nationally representative survey
    Hanul Park, Kang-Sook Lee
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mee-Ri Lee, Sung Min Jung, Frances Chung
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(6): e0287182.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Mental Health between the Older People Living Alone and Older People Not Living Alone before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Using the 2019-2020 Korea Community Health Survey
    Kyong Sil Park, Yeojoo Chae
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2023; 48(2): 132.     CrossRef
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    Mi-Sun Lee, Hooyeon Lee
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gender Inequalities in Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-based Study in Korea
    Minku Kang, Sarah Yu, Seung-Ah Choe, Daseul Moon, Myung Ki, Byung Chul Chun
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(5): 413.     CrossRef
  • Mental health status of individuals with diabetes in Korea before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a comparison of data from the Korean national health and nutrition examination surveys of 2018–2019 and 2020–2021
    Hyejin Jung
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(10): e074080.     CrossRef
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    Cumhur Korkmaz, Sibel Dikicier, Arzu Atay
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    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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COVID-19: Original Article
Depression, anxiety, and stress in Korean general population during the COVID-19 pandemic
Hooyeon Lee, Dongwoo Choi, Jung Jae Lee
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022018.   Published online January 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022018
  • 15,634 View
  • 632 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of poor mental health in the general Korean population during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
METHODS
This cross-sectional, population-based, online survey-based study was conducted from November 5 to 20, 2020 and included adults aged 20-49 years in Chungnam Province, Korea. A total of 549 adults were included.
RESULTS
In total, 18.8% of the participants had symptoms of depression, 10.6% had symptoms of anxiety, and 5.1% had a high level of perceived stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Higher levels of stress (odds ratio [OR], 3.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13 to 8.67), anxiety (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.09 to 4.49), and depression (OR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.64 to 5.50) were found among never married, widowed, divorced, and separated people than among married/cohabiting/partnered participants. Participants who felt increased stress at home during the COVID-19 outbreak reported more depression (OR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.49 to 4.05) and anxiety (OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.31 to 4.50). Women had higher risks of anxiety (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.09 to 3.58) and stress (OR, 6.40; 95% CI, 2.30 to 17.85) than men. Participants with the highest household income were less likely to report symptoms of stress than those with the lowest household income (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.96).
CONCLUSIONS
The participants in this study exhibited poor mental health index scores, suggesting that some people are at risk for mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. Being married was independently and significantly associated with a lower likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구는 코로나-19 유행 기간 동안 정신건강 현황과 위험 요인을 알아보기 위한 단면연구이다. 코로나 19 유행 이후 가정내 스트레스가 증가했다고 응답한 경우 우울증과 불안감의 유병률이 높았다. 반면, 남성인 경우, 결혼했거나 동거인과 같이 살고 있는 경우에는 우울증, 불안 또는 스트레스의 유병률이 통계적으로 유의하게 낮았다. 마스크 착용하기, 비대면 활동 증가, 또는 사회적 거리두기 등 코로나 19의 유행을 통제하기 위한 많은 정책은 개인의 일상생활과 정신건강에 많은 영향을 미쳤다. 이 연구는 취약 집단을 발굴하고, 정신건강 회복을 위한 전략을 개발하는데 기초자료를 제공할 수 있다.
Key Message
This study revealed high prevalence rates of depression, anxiety, and stress in the general population of Korea aged 20-49 years during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants who felt increased stress at home reported more depression and anxiety. Men and being married were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of depression, anxiety, or stress. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a traumatic event. In addi­tion, the policies created to prevent its spread have disrupted daily living for the general population. Implement­ing strategies to promote resilience and support psychologically vulnerable individuals during the COVID-19 cri­sis is of fundamental importance.

Citations

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  • Pandemic stressors and mental health indicators in eight countries
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Original Articles
Elder abuse/mistreatment and associated covariates in India: results from the Longitudinal Aging Study in India wave 1, 2017-2018
Thennavan Sathya, Yesuvadian Selvamani, Rangasamy Nagarajan
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022017.   Published online January 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022017
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Elder abuse has significant adverse consequences for the overall health and well-being of the elderly, including premature mortality. Using cross-sectional data, we assessed the prevalence of elder abuse in India, its variation across states, and associated factors.
METHODS
Nationally representative data from the first wave of the Longitudinal Aging Study in India were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to study the prevalence, state variations, and associated factors of elder abuse.
RESULTS
Overall, 5.2% of elderly adults (≥60 years) had experienced abuse in the year prior to the survey and 3% had experienced abuse within their own household. Verbal abuse or disrespect was the most common form of abuse. Considerable variation was observed in the prevalence of elder abuse across states and union territories, with the highest prevalence observed in Bihar (11.6%) and Karnataka (10.1%). In regression analysis, education level emerged as a protective factor against elder abuse, particularly among women. Older adults who lived alone, had functional limitations, had multiple morbidities, and had been hospitalized in the past year were more likely to experience abuse. Older adults who experienced abuse were 2 times more likely to experience depressive symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS
Cross-state variation in the prevalence of elder abuse and subgroup differences suggest that state-specific interventions and essential monitoring of older adults with functional limitations, chronic diseases, and recent hospitalization can further reduce the prevalence and consequences of elder abuse in India.
Summary
Key Message
Elder abuse is one of the common forms of violence among the elderly. This study finds a significant proportion (5.2%) of Indian elderly reported elder abuse with considerable state-variations. The prevalence of elder abuse is higher in the states of Bihar (11.6%) and Karnataka (10.1%). Gender differences in elder abuse is notable where women is more likely to experience abuse than men. Education is a key protective factor of abuse. Elderly with multimorbidity and functional limitations are more likely to experience abuse. The elder abuse is positively associated with depressive symptoms.

Citations

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  • Understanding Elder Abuse in India: Contributing Factors and Policy Suggestions
    Priya Maurya, Aparajita Chattopadhyay, Smitha Rao, Palak Sharma
    Journal of Population Ageing.2024; 17(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Association between Multimorbidity and Psychological Distress among Older Adults in India: The Moderating Role of Elder Abuse
    T Sathya, Y Selvamani, R. Nagarajan, M. Mathew Arumai
    Clinical Gerontologist.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors of elder abuse in survivors of stroke: A cross‐sectional study
    Guifen Zhang, Minyuan Chen, Peiyi Xiao, Zhibo Peng
    Health Science Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Elder Mistreatment as a Risk Factor for Depression and Suicidal Ideation in Korean Older Adults
    Min-So Paek, Mi Jin Lee, Yu-Seon Shin
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11165.     CrossRef
Independent predictors of depressive symptoms and social isolation on 2-year all-cause mortality among the Korean elderly in a population-based cohort study: gender differences
Hyunsuk Jeong, Hyeon Woo Yim, Beom-Woo Nam
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022012.   Published online January 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022012
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  • 499 Download
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study examined whether depressive symptoms and social isolation were independent predictors of 2-year all-cause mortality among the elderly using data from a population-based cohort study.
METHODS
In total, 1,033 participants (320 men and 713 women) older than 60 years of age participated in this study. Depressive symptoms, social isolation status, and socio-demographic and health-related covariates were assessed at baseline. The primary outcome measure was 2-year all-cause mortality. Data were collected through in-person interviews by trained interviewers. The GENMOD procedure was used to calculate relative risks (RRs).
RESULTS
Of the 1,033 participants, 102 (40 men and 62 women) died within the follow-up period of 2 years. During the 2-year follow-up period, 17.8% of depressed men and 12.3% of depressed women died, and 29.8% of socially isolated men and 14.9% of socially isolated women died. Social isolation was an independent predictor of mortality in elderly men (adjusted relative risk [aRR], 4.6, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 10.2), while depressive symptoms were an independent predictor of mortality in elderly women (aRR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.6) when controlling for potential confounding factors. However, the depressive symptoms detected using the geriatric depression scale were not associated with mortality in men, and social isolation was not associated with mortality in women.
CONCLUSIONS
The effects of depressive symptoms and social isolation on 2-year all-cause mortality within an elderly population differed according to gender. Gender-specific community-based interventions must be developed to potentially reduce 2-year all-cause mortality among the elderly.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 지역사회 거주하는 저소득층 노인을 대상으로 한 코호트 연구로 2년 추적조사를 수행하여 사망 원인의 예측인자를 분석하였다. 남성노인에서는 사회적 고립이, 여성노인에서는 우울증상이 2년 모든 사망원인의 독립적인 예측인자였다. 노인의 사망율을 줄이기 위한 지역사회 개입 프로그램은 남성에게는 사회적 고립을 해소를, 여성에게는 우울증상 개선을 위한 프로그램이 요구된다.
Key Message
The effects of depressive symptoms and so¬cial isolation on 2-year all-cause mortality among the elderly dif¬fered according to gender. For elderly men, social isolation increased the risk of 2-year all-cause mortality by 4.6 times compared to those who were not socially isolated. However, the depressive symptoms identified by the GDS-15 were not associated with 2-year all-cause mortality in men. From a public health perspective, these findings suggest that gender-specific community-based interventions are needed to mitigate all-cause mortality among the elderly.

Citations

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  • Relationship between Cognition, Depression, and Oral health status in Older adults: A longitudinal cross-lagged analysis
    Bo Zhao, Xiaoxu Jiang, Fanlei Kong, Eun Woo Nam
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2023; 330: 158.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of 90 cohort studies of social isolation, loneliness and mortality
    Fan Wang, Yu Gao, Zhen Han, Yue Yu, Zhiping Long, Xianchen Jiang, Yi Wu, Bing Pei, Yukun Cao, Jingyu Ye, Maoqing Wang, Yashuang Zhao
    Nature Human Behaviour.2023; 7(8): 1307.     CrossRef
  • Gender Inequalities in Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-based Study in Korea
    Minku Kang, Sarah Yu, Seung-Ah Choe, Daseul Moon, Myung Ki, Byung Chul Chun
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(5): 413.     CrossRef
Associations of regional-level perceived stress and depression with health-related quality of life in Korean adults: a multilevel analysis of 2017 Korea Community Health Survey data
Eunsu Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Jung-Ho Yang, Soon-Ki Ahn, Baeg-Ju Na, Hae-Sung Nam
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021062.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021062
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
We examined the associations of individual and regional-level perceived stress and depression with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Korean adults.
METHODS
We used data from the 2017 Korea Community Health Survey, which included 216,713 adults living within 254 municipal districts. As individual-level independent variables, perceived stress (higher vs. lower) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 ≥10) were defined. Regional-level age-adjusted rates of perceived stress (%) and depression (%) were created for 254 municipal districts and categorized into quartiles to generate regional levels of stress and depression. HRQOL was defined as the individual-level EuroQol 5-dimensional index×100. A multilevel analysis was performed to identify the relationship between individual or regional-level independent variables and individual HRQOL.
RESULTS
In the null model, the proportions of individual variation in the HRQOL explained by region were 1.7% and 2.7% for men and women, respectively. When adjusted with all individual-level variables, regional stress and depression, as well as individual-level perceived stress and depression, were significantly related to HRQOL for both genders. In the full model including all variables, the decrease in HRQOL from the first to the fourth quartile group of regional stress was greater in women (-1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.87 to -0.31) than in men (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.04 to -0.26).
CONCLUSIONS
Our results suggest that regional-level perceived stress and depression, as well as individual-level perceived stress and depression, are inversely associated with individual HRQOL.
Summary
Korean summary
시군구 단위 스트레스 인지율과 우울 유병률이 개인 단위 건강관련 삶의 질 수준과 연관성을 갖는지 파악하고자 지역사회건강조사 자료를 이용하여 다수준 분석을 수행하였다. 개인 수준에서 인지된 스트레스와 우울은 건강관련 삶의 질 감소와 관련이 있었다. 스트레스와 우울 수준이 높은 시군구일수록 개인의 건강관련 삶의 질은 낮아지는 관계를 보였는데, 이는 남성보다는 여성에서 더 저명하였다.
Key Message
This study examined the associations of regional-level perceived stress and depression with individual HRQOL measured in terms of the EQ-5D using a multilevel model. Individual-level perceived stress and depression were significantly related to individual HRQOL. Regional stress and depression were also significant factors and both had greater negative impacts on HRQOL among women than among men.

Citations

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  • Association between seafood intake and depression in Korean adults: analysis of data from the 2014–2020 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hyemin Shin, Won Jang, Yangha Kim
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2023; 56(6): 702.     CrossRef
  • Depression before and during-COVID-19 by Gender in the Korean Population
    Won-Tae Cha, Hye-Jin Joo, Yu-Shin Park, Eun-Cheol Park, Soo-Young Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(6): 3477.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Regional Levels of Particulate Matter and Recurrent Falls in Korea
    Jung-Ho Yang, Ji-An Jeong, Sun-Seog Kweon, Min-Ho Shin
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Association between weekly fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms: results from the Korean Elderly Environmental Panel study
Youjeong Yuk, Chae-Rin Han, Yoonyoung Jang, Yun-Chul Hong, Yoon-Jung Choi
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021029.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021029
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Although previous studies have investigated the correlation between fruit and vegetable consumption and depression, the results remain inconclusive. The present study aimed to investigate the association between weekly fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms in elderly Koreans.
METHODS
A multiple covariate linear regression analysis was performed using the data of 1,226 elderly individuals ≥ 60 years of age who participated in the Korean Elderly Environmental Panel II study from 2012 to 2014. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Korean version of the Short form Geriatric Depression Scale (SGDS-K). Generalized linear mixed-effects models were constructed to analyze the repeated measurements of 305 people who participated in the survey every year.
RESULTS
After adjusting for confounders, SGDS-K scores were negatively associated with the frequency of weekly fruit consumption as follows (β [95% confidence interval; CI]: -0.17 [-0.28 to -0.05], -0.17 [-0.27 to -0.07], -0.42 [-0.54 to 0.29], and -0.33 [-0.44 to -0.21]) for less than 1 time/wk, 1-3 times/wk, 4-6 times/wk, and daily, respectively, compared to no consumption. The SGDS-K scores were also negatively associated with the frequency of vegetable consumption (β [95% CI]: -0.86 [-1.18 to -0.55], -0.18 [-0.35 to -0.01], -0.36 [-0.53 to -0.18], and -0.15 [-0.29 to 0.00]) in the above order, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
Fruit consumption was inversely associated with depression levels in a dose-dependent manner. Although there was no dose-response relationship between vegetable consumption and the level of depression, it was negatively associated with SGDS-K scores.
Summary
Korean summary
KEEP-II 데이터를 활용하여 한국 노년층의 주간 과일 및 채소 섭취 빈도와 우울증상 간의 상관관계를 알아보았다. 주중 과일을 섭취하는 빈도와 우울증상의 정도 및 우울증 이환 간에서 음의 상관관계가 있었으며 양반응관계가 나타났다. 채소 섭취 빈도의 경우에는 양반응관계가 나타나지 않았으나 채소 섭취 빈도와 우울증상의 정도 간에 음의 상관관계가 있었다.
Key Message
Weekly fruit consumption frequency was inversely associated with the level of depression in a dose-dependent manner in Korean elderly population who participated in KEEP-II study. Although there was no dose-response relationship between vegetable consumption and the level of depression, vegetable consumption frequency was negatively associated with the level of depression.

Citations

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  • Bidirectional associations between dietary diversity and depressive symptoms in Chinese adult women: A retrospective cohort study
    Xiaoqian Dong, Ying Li, Xingxing Wang, Yinglong Duan, Min Liu, Sha Wang, Xue He, Pingting Yang, Yaqin Wang, Jianfei Xie, Andy S.K. Cheng
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 351: 683.     CrossRef
  • Regional differences in the effects of healthy aging on depressive symptoms: a Korean longitudinal study of aging (2006–2020)
    Soo Jin Kang, Jinseub Hwang, Dohyang Kim, Bongjeong Kim
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, and Neuroprotective Effects of Polyphenols—Polyphenols as an Element of Diet Therapy in Depressive Disorders
    Anna Winiarska-Mieczan, Małgorzata Kwiecień, Karolina Jachimowicz-Rogowska, Janine Donaldson, Ewa Tomaszewska, Ewa Baranowska-Wójcik
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(3): 2258.     CrossRef
  • Genetic and environmental influences on fruit and vegetable consumption and depression in older adults
    Annabel P. Matison, Anbupalam Thalamuthu, Victoria M. Flood, Julian N. Trollor, Vibeke S. Catts, Margaret J. Wright, David Ames, Henry Brodaty, Perminder S. Sachdev, Simone Reppermund, Karen A. Mather
    BMC Geriatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption with depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older adults in South Africa
    Supa Pengpid, Karl Peltzer
    BMC Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
The effects of mental health on recurrent falls among elderly adults, based on Korean Community Health Survey data
Kyung Hee Jo, Jong Park, So Yeon Ryu
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020005.   Published online February 2, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020005
  • 13,674 View
  • 296 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to identify the effect of mental health on frequency of falls (single and recurrent falls) among elderly adults.
METHODS
Data were drawn from the 2015 Korean Community Health Survey. A chi-square test was conducted to compare differences in fall frequency according to health-related behaviors, chronic diseases, and mental health. Subsequently, multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to identify the effects of mental health on single and recurrent falls based on variables found to be significant in the chi-square test.
RESULTS
Recurrent falls were found to be more risky than single falls. Depression was significantly related to single falls (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 1.44). Depression (OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.38 to 1.76), sleep disorder (5 hours or less: OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.23; more than 9 hours: OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.44, respectively), and subjective stress (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.90 to 2.78) were significantly related to recurrent falls.
CONCLUSIONS
The study’s findings suggest that specialized fall prevention programs are needed to address different types of falls in elderly adults. To prevent recurrent falls, systematic treatment strategies and rehabilitation training must improve physical function and mental health.
Summary
Korean summary
우리나라 노인에서 정신건강이 낙상에 미치는 영향을 확인하였고, 그 결과 단순낙상은 우울감 경험을 한 경우 낙상발생 위험이 증가했으며, 반복낙상은 우울감을 경험하고, 수면장애가 있으며(수면시간 6시간 미만, 9시간 이상), 주관적 스트레스가 커질수록 낙상 위험이 증가하였다. 최종적으로 노인의 정신건강이 반복낙상에 미치는 영향이 더 큰 것을 확인하였다. 본 연구결과를 통해 낙상 예방 및 관리를 위한 보건사업을 제시하고, 반복낙상자의 정신적/신체적 기능 증진을 위한 치료전략과 재활훈련 계획의 근거자료로 활용할 수 있을 것으로 생각된다.

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Review
Meta-analysis of the prevalence of depression among breast cancer survivors in Iran: an urgent need for community supportive care programs
Hassan Ahmadi Gharaei, Mostafa Dianatinasab, Seyyed Mostafa Kouhestani, Mohammad Fararouei, Hossein Moameri, Reza Pakzad, Reza Ghaiasvand
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019030.   Published online July 4, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019030
  • 13,787 View
  • 299 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Depression, which is the most common comorbidity in breast cancer (BC) patients, has adverse effects on patients’ quality of life, disease progress, and survival.
METHODS
The protocol of this study was registered in PROSPERO (registration No. CRD42019121494). We electronically searched published studies through January 2019 with the aim of finding articles that investigated the prevalence of depression among BC survivors. Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar were searched to obtain relevant published studies. This review included 14 cross-sectional and 4 cohort studies published from 2000 to 2018. We used a random-effects model to conduct the meta-analysis and generated a summary estimate for the pooled prevalence with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A subgroup analysis was also conducted based on the depression assessment tool used and the study design.
RESULTS
The total sample size of the studies contained 2,799 women with BC, including 1,228 women who were diagnosed with depression. The pooled prevalence of depression among Iranian women with BC was 46.83% (95% CI, 33.77 to 59.88) with significant heterogeneity (I2 =98.5%; p<0.001). The prevalence of depression ranged from 14.00% (95% CI, 4.91 to 23.09) to 95.90% (95% CI, 91.97 to 99.83). The results of the subgroup analyses suggested that the depression assessment tool, year of publication, and study design were sources of heterogeneity.
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings indicate a high prevalence of depression among BC patients, underscoring the urgent need for clinicians and health authorities to provide well-defined social and psychological supportive care programs for these patients.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The prevalence of anxiety and depression in cancer around the world: An overview of systematic reviews evaluating 128 meta-analyses
    Javier Martinez-Calderon, Cristina García-Muñoz, Alberto Marcos Heredia-Rizo, Francisco Javier Cano-García
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 351: 701.     CrossRef
  • Global prevalence and factors associated with preoperative depression in women undergoing breast surgery: a meta-analysis and meta-regression
    Celest Su Yi Leo, Ling Jie Cheng, Xin Rong Lam, Honggu He
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Breast cancer survivors–supportive care needs: systematic review
    Rahimeh Khajoei, Mahnaz Ilkhani, Payam Azadeh, Sima Zohari Anboohi, Fatemah Heshmati Nabavi
    BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.2023; 13(2): 143.     CrossRef
  • How does social media use influence the mental health of pancreatic cancer patients: a chain mediating effect of online social support and psychological resilience
    Yi Wang, Sheng Bao, Yubing Chen
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and severity of anxiety and depression in Chinese patients with breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Fuying Tao, Mengnan Xu, Qi Zou, Lin Tang, Jianping Feng, Zhenyu Li
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer: probabilistic bias analysis for adjustment of exposure misclassification bias and confounders
    Reza Pakzad, Saharnaz Nedjat, Hamid Salehiniya, Nasrin Mansournia, Mahyar Etminan, Maryam Nazemipour, Iraj Pakzad, Mohammad Ali Mansournia
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hussein Amer Hussein Al-Saffar, Nibras Alaa Hussain
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  • Global and regional geographical prevalence of depression in gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mostafa Kouhestani, Hasan Ahmadi Gharaei, Mohammad Fararouei, Hasan Hosienpour Ghahremanloo, Reza Ghaiasvand, Mostafa Dianatinasab
    BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.2022; 12(e4): e526.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of anxiety and depression and its association with coping strategies, supportive care needs, and social support among women with breast cancer
    Hassan Okati-Aliabad, Alireza Ansari-Moghadam, Mahdi Mohammadi, Shiva Kargar, Fariba Shahraki-Sanavi
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2022; 30(1): 703.     CrossRef
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    Shu-Yi Yang, Hanoch Livneh, Jing-Siang Jhang, Shu-Wen Yen, Hua-Lung Huang, Michael W. Y. Chan, Ming-Chi Lu, Chia-Chou Yeh, Chang-Kuo Wei, Tzung-Yi Tsai
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Original Articles
Estimating causal associations of atopic dermatitis with depression using the propensity score method: an analysis of Korea Community Health Survey data, 2010-2013
Hayon Michelle Choi, Dahye Kim, Whanhee Lee, Ho Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018059.   Published online November 29, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018059
  • 12,395 View
  • 187 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Numerous studies have reported associations between atopic dermatitis (AD) and depression, but the causal relationship between the 2 diseases has not been established. Therefore, this study used the propensity score method to investigate whether there was a positive causal effect of AD on depression in 16 regions (cities and provinces) in Korea.
METHODS
The study analyzed 16 regions (cities and provinces) in Korea, using data obtained from the Korea Community Health Survey for the years 2010-2013. Propensity score matching was used to estimate the causal influence of AD on depression in Korea.
RESULTS
After propensity score matching, the standardized difference for each covariate among the 16 regions (cities and provinces) was less than 1, indicating a balance between the case and control groups. At the national level, those diagnosed with AD had a 2.31 times higher risk for being diagnosed with depression than those who had not been diagnosed with AD. In particular, the risk was highest in North Jeolla Province (odds ratio [OR], 4.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28 to 10.43) and lowest in Gwangju (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.87 to 3.79), and the OR for Seoul was 2.23 (95% CI, 1.66 to 2.99).
CONCLUSIONS
This study provides insights into how causal inferences can be derived from observational studies, through an analysis of Korea Community Health Survey data. Furthermore, the study results have implications for region-specific guidelines for preventive health policies targeting depression.
Summary
Korean summary
성향 점수 매칭을 이용하여 전국 및 16개 시/도 별 아토피 피부염과 우울증 사이의 인과성을 추정한 결과, 전국에서 아토피 피부염을 진단 받은 사람이 진단 받지 않은 사람들에 비해 우울증 위험도가 2.38배 높았다(CI: 1.29-4.38).

Citations

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  • Epidemiology of mental health comorbidity in patients with atopic dermatitis: An analysis of global trends from 1998 to 2022
    Xiao‐ce Cai, Si‐han Wang, Chun‐xiao Wang, Liu Liu, Jiao Wang, Yu‐hong Shen, Xin Li
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    Juhwan Yoo, Ha Yeh Rin Koo, Kyungdo Han, Young Bok Lee
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  • Combined Oral and Topical Application of Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) Alleviates Contact Dermatitis Associated With Depression Through Downregulation Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines
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Sleep quality and associated factors among the elderly living in rural Chiang Rai, northern Thailand
Weerakorn Thichumpa, Nopporn Howteerakul, Nawarat Suwannapong, Visasiri Tantrakul
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018018.   Published online May 14, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018018
  • 17,627 View
  • 400 Download
  • 34 Web of Science
  • 48 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of poor sleep quality and to identify associated factors among community-dwelling elderly individuals in northern Thailand.
METHODS
A cross-sectional study was conducted among 266 randomly selected elderly people in a sub-district in rural Chiang Rai Province, northern Thailand. The participants were interviewed using the Thai version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).
RESULTS
Roughly 44.0% of the participants had poor sleep quality (PSQI score, >5), 9.4% used sleep medication, 27.1% had poor family relationships, and 12.0% had mild depression. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that being female (odds ratio [OR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 3.02), a higher education level (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.34 to 6.86 for primary school; OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.31 to 5.44 for higher than primary school), mild depression (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.11 to 6.36), and poor family relationships (OR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.98 to 6.75) were significantly associated with poor sleep quality.
CONCLUSIONS
The prevalence of poor sleep quality among the elderly was moderately high. Healthcare providers should regularly conduct screenings for sleep quality and depression; provide sleep health education; and conduct interventions to encourage participating in family activities, resolving conflicts, sharing ideas, and making compromises within the family.
Summary

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Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health